History of Leith, Edinburgh

Archive for the ‘Featured Articles’ Category

Historic Views

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

I have decided to create a website of views of Historic views and photographs of Historic buildings, streets from around the country that will be helpful to the professional and local historian not forgetting the family genealogist. The website is called called “Historic Views” I have decided to create a website of views of Historic views and photographs of Historic buildings, streets from around the country that will be helpful to the professional and local historian not forgetting the family genealogist. The website is called called “Historic Views” and can be found here

Major dig under way at Leith Fort in Edinburgh

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

A major excavation of Leith Fort in Edinburgh is to get under way in a bid to unearth artefacts from the early 19th Century. The fort was originally constructed in 1780 to defend the port of Leith against the American Navy. for more click here

History: Lamb’s House, Leith

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Lamb’s House was probably one of the finest merchants’ houses in Scotland in the 16th and 17th centuries. It is an impressive four storey A listed building with crow-stepped gables, tall chimneys and massive fireplaces. for more click here

East Lothian’s Broxmouth fort reveals edge of steel

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Archaeologists have identified the earliest use of steel in the British Isles from a site in East Lothian. for more click here

Lothian, John, ca. 1805-1846

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

Lothian, John, ca. 1805-1846
Wood, John, ca. 1780-1847
Title: Lothian’s Plan of the Town of Leith and its vicinity. for more click here

Thomson, Charles, fl. 1820-1831

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

Title: Plan of the Town of Leith and its environs. for more click here

Lancefield, Alfred, fl. 1843-1855

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

Johnston’s plan of Edinburgh & Leith. for more click here

Doomed to wander

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

13th March 1656. — It is unanimuslie condescended and concluded that our petitione sould be sent up to England to the Lord Protector concerning our Kirk that it would please his Heighness to cause restor it to us agan that wee may convein in it for ye worship of God, seing we have no place to meitt in but in ye open fields.

Also to writ to Collonel Fenwick governour of Leith qo for the pnt is at Londone that his honour would be assistant yrunto.
(Note.—These Minutes show the forlorn lot of the congregation doomed to wander (because of support of the monarchy) in the wilderness all these months. The services were, we may suppose, held none the less regularly, the people gathering round the Giant’s Brae, on which the minister stood to preach. Even so the services were subject to surveillance by the evangelical troops of the Protector.)

“Magasin” means war stores

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

26 of June 1656.—Anthoine Rosewell, James Cutler and John Young Tailzr are desyred to goe to the North Kirk Session of Leith to intimat unto them that ye Counsell of State in Scotland efter ye sight of ane reference (from his heighness The Lord Protector) haith appoynted the south congregation of Leith to have the use of the north kirk to preach in for a tyme until the Magasin be removit from ye south paroch unto ye Citidal, at which tym the south congregatioun are to be restored to yr owne south kirk again, God willing.

(Note. — “Magasin” means war stores. The inference from this Minute is that the stores of the army — provisions, guns, horses, etc. — were kept in and about South Leith church, which formed the headquarters of the garrison until these were removed to the Citadel. The Citadel of North Leith was one of the great fortifications built by Cromwell — “passing fair and sumptuous.” To make way for it, the burial place of North Leith was removed to the banks of the Water of Leith, where it remains still as a witness to the warlike energy of the great Protector. A description of the Citadel will be found in the histories of Leith. The main entrance, a strong archway thirty feet deep, may still be seen leading off Dock Street, )

Scotland’s oldest bride and groom tie the knot after more than 30 years together

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

BILL BURNETT, 86, and his 89-year-old partner Jane Pollock had been living together for three decades before Bill proposed, and the couple eventually married at South Leith Parish Church in Edinburgh yesterday. for more click here

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