History of Leith, Edinburgh

Archive for 2013

Dorset records

Sunday, November 24th, 2013


Maritime Masters

Sunday, November 24th, 2013


The key keeper

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

21 April 1701.—Compeared Robert New-lands, Alexander Gray, John Rutherfoord and James Calder, Key Keepers in ye Church and were exorted to be civill and discreet to strangers and to wait upon yr seats to let people yt are to communicate out and in without lousing yr seats.
Appoints ye Moderator and Alexander Craufioord to speak to ye Lievetennent Collonell and ye Major and to tell them yt they cannot expect a Loft to be allowed to ye souldiers on the Communion Sabath and also to desyre the officers to provid seats for themselves.
(Note.—As part of the preparations for the Communion the key keepers were cited to appear before the Session and exhorted to be civil and discreet. It was part of their duty to guard the sittings of their employers and as the demand for accommodation was very great, disputes among them were not uncommon. This citation continued to be made down to the end of the century, but in time it became a mere formality, the later Minutes bearing that the key keepers were cited but none appeared.)

source-South Leith Records

Constables

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

26 June 1701.—The Session being informed that Andrew Garioch sone to William Garioch sware severall tymes God Damn him if he would not doe so and so to some person and being reproved by Robert Andersone one of ye present deacons of ye Session and a present Constable he took hold of his gravatt with one hand and haveing his kane in ye other hand threatened to beat him three severall tymes saying what are you a Constable, show your badge. Appoints ye said Andrew to be summoned to ye Session. (Note.—Constables were appointed for Leith by the Magistrates and the Session as feudal superiors of St. Anthony’s made an appointment for that district. The constables are mentioned in the Records for the previous century and are now represented by the High Constables. Their duties were numerous and included the apprehension of offenders.)

South Leith Records

John 19th Earl of Crawford

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

16 January 1701.—James Forest and James Robertsone searched afternoon and reported to the Committee that they saw ye Earle of Crauffoord and two servants riding towards ye sands in tyme of sermon. The Committee overtures that some be appointed to speak to ye said Earle; Read and approven, and appoints Bayllie Douglas, Bayllie Whyte, Alexr. Crauffoord to speak to him and to tell him if the like be found again, the Session will be oblidged to dilate him to ye presbitry.
(Note.—The reference is to John 19th Earl of Crawford, who became a steady supporter of the Union of the Parliaments in 1707.)

South Leith Records

Leith Mills

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

19 December 1700.-Alexander Crauffoord represented to ye Session that ye.Master of Balmirino’s Chamberland alleaged that the Brewery possessed be him was thirled to Leith Mills & that he had tabled the same before the Barrony Court. The Session finding that ye said Brlwery is possessed be the^said Alexande Crauffoord and also ye households of St. Antons and that they never knew ye said Brewery or house to be thirled to any Milne but ye possessors yrof were att liberty to grind at any M ne they pleased, appoints ye Clerk to glve Alexander Crauffoord ane extract hereof.
(Note -Leith Mills stood at the bottom of what is now Ballantyne Boad, and in olden days they were reached by Mill Lane. The Balmenno family sold them to Edinburgh Corporation in 1722 They were evidently the Mills of the Barony of Restalng to which the Snanl of the estate were thirled, that is, bound to bring all their grain to be ground.)

Source-South Leith Records

The searchers

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

16th May 1700.—Bethea Andersone Serve-rris to Mr Alexr. Losby and Mary Andersone ier Sister from whom the Searchers caused plaids to be taken, being found vagening on ye -ibbath day in ye tyme of Sermon and they having no excuse which ye Session could sustain
• were both rebuked and exorted to sauctifie tie Sabbath in tyme comeing and were referrd to ye Magistrates for what concernes ye civil hnr.
(Note.—The searchers frequently appropriated the ilaids or shawls of women found breaking the Sabbath

source-South Leith Records

Cases of discipline

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

19 September 1700.—Reported be the Clerk yt Giels Hayfield was put in ye Jogs on Tuesday last, and that the Magistrates had banished her out of Leith and Edinburgh and ye privileges yrof and never to be seen yrin under ye pain of being burnt on ye cheek and otherways punished as ye Magistrates shall think fitt.
(Note.—About this time the Register is largely taken up with cases of discipline, the Minister and Session acting as a tribunal for the trial of a great variety of offences. If the accused party hesitated to plead he was ” earnestly exhorted and seriously entreated to give glory to God in a full and free confession of guilt.” Where an accusation was denied witnesses were examined these being ” sworn and purged of malice and partial counsell” and exhorted by the Minister to be “ingenuous.” Their statements were written down at length by the Session Clerk (John Selkrig) and signed by them or, if they could not write, by the Session Clerk or the Minister on their behalf. The fines imposed by the Magistrates were handed over to the Kirk Treasurer.)

source-South Leith Record

Rolls of the poor

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

18 June 1706.—The Session haveing seen the poor and considered yr severall cases allowed them yr particular weekly pensions so far as the money collected would allow, conform to a roll out of which ye Clerk is to give ye deacons yr particular rolls.
(Note.—Rolls of the poor and of the weekly payments to be made to them were’made up from time to time and sometimes appeared in the Registers. The deacons distributed the money to those named in the Rolls.)

source-South Leith Record

The bluegowns-1706

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

The bluegowns had a general commission to beg. They were known as the King’s bedsmen, because the King annually distributed charity to them and they were expected to pray for him. Their number was equal to the years the King had lived and each year they received a new gown and badge.

source-South Leith Records

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