The History of Leith

November 28, 2012

Edward III., unlike his grandfather, knew how to choose his officers.

Sir John de Stirling commandeered a fleet of eighteen
boats from Cramond, Musselburgh, and other places, to
be moored af Leith for the use of his garrison, and now
and again the governor’s account books give us a peep
at the rather exciting incidents Leith sometimes experienced
during the English occupation. Sir Andrew
Murray of Bothwell, the courageous son of the heroic
companion of Wallace, was besieging Cupar Castle in
Fife, skilfully defended for the English by William
Bulloch, a clergyman of great military talent who had
mistaken his calling. Sir John de Stirling determined
to cross the Scots Water—that is, the Firth of Forth—
and relieve it. For this purpose he had gathered together
at Leith a fleet of thirty-two vessels and two
hundred and twenty-four mariners. Suddenly crossing
the Forth with the whole of the Edinburgh garrison,
he successfully accomplished the relief of Bulloch, and
returned to Leith within the marvellously short space
of four days. But then Edward III., unlike his grandfather,
knew how to choose his officers.

source-The Story of leith

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