History of Leith, Edinburgh

Archive for 2010

A Long Patrol

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

The first of the Castle Class Corvettes built at Leith, H.M.S. ” Flint Castle,” steamed 45,000 miles on convoy duty off the West African coast without docking for rest or repair.
It is almost certain she sank a large submarine, but the ” kill ” was not claimed as there was no trace other than oil coming to the surface.

Since the end of hostilities, ” Flint Castle ” has been a member of the force of Norwegian and British warships escorting thousands of German army and navy prisoners back to their country by sea from
Norway. .,

Two of this class, before completion, were transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy, their names being ” Hespeler ” and ” Orangeville,”
the names of two well-known Canadian towns

Both these ships undertook arduous convoy duties in the Western
Atlantic off the Newfoundland and Labrador coasts. ” Hespeler ”
was credited with the sinking of a U-boat. They belonged to the well known Canadian Squadron known as the ” Barber Pole ” group. The
group was so named because each of the ships had a’ red-and-white
barber pole on her funnel.

At the close of the German war, ” Hespeler ” was transferred by way of Panama Canal to the Pacific, and arrived at Vancouver exactly on V.J. Day, in time to take part in the victory celebrations.

Both she and her sister ship, ” Orangeville,” are now being sold out of the Canadian Navy, and will in all probability be converted into speedy passenger ships and go into the service of Union Steamships, Ltd., of Vancouver.

The Origins of St Giles’

Monday, December 27th, 2010

There is record of a parish church in Edinburgh by the year 854, served by a vicar from a monastic house, probably in England. It is possible that the first church, a modest affair, was in use for several centuries before it was formally dedicated by the bishop of St Andrews on 6 October 1243. The parish church of Edinburgh was subsequently reconsecrated and named in honour of the patron saint of the town, St Giles, whose feast day is celebrated on 1 September. for more click here

The Thistle Chapel

Monday, December 27th, 2010

The Order of the Thistle is Scotland’s great order of chivalry, and membership is considered to be one of the country’s highest honours. The Order is traditionally given to Scots or people of Scots ancestry, who have given distinguished service. Appointments are entirely in the personal gift of the Sovereign. for more click here

Order of the Thistle

Monday, December 27th, 2010

The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle is an order of chivalry associated with Scotland. The current version of the Order was founded in 1687 by King James VII of Scotland (also known as James II of England) who asserted that he was reviving an earlier Order. The Order consists of the Sovereign and sixteen Knights and Ladies, as well as certain “extra” knights (members of the British Royal Family and foreign monarchs). The Sovereign alone grants membership of the Order; he or she is not advised by the Government, as occurs with most other Orders. for more click here

The entrance to the Thistle Chapel-St Giles

Monday, December 27th, 2010


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(c) John Arthur

Scatter my Ashes-Montrose

Monday, December 27th, 2010


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(c) John Arthur

Flags-St Giles,Edinburgh

Monday, December 27th, 2010


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(c) John Arthur

The Interior of St Giles-Edinburgh

Monday, December 27th, 2010


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(c) John Arthur

St Giles and the Mercat Cross-Edinburgh

Monday, December 27th, 2010


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(c) John Arthur

HMS Loch Achanalt

Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010


source-Leith Built Ships on War Service

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