History of Leith, Edinburgh

Archive for June, 2008

Message from the Editor

Saturday, June 28th, 2008

Due to going into Hospital this site may not be updated for the next two weeks.

The Editor

EDINBURGH SOUTH AFRICA (BOER WAR) ROYAL SCOTS GREYS WAR MEMORIAL

Friday, June 27th, 2008

The memorial erected to the Fallen Heroes of the Royal Scots Greys (2nd Dragoons) on Princess Street in Edinburgh was unveilled by the Earl of Roseberry, K.G., P.C., on 16th November 1906. for more click here

William Birnie Rhind RSA (1853-1933)

Friday, June 27th, 2008

William Birnie Rhind RSA (1853-1933) was a Scottish sculptor.

Rhind was born in Edinburgh as the eldest son of sculptor John Rhind, and the elder brother of J. Massey Rhind. The two brothers set up a studio in Glasgow in 1885, then Birnie moved to Edinburgh, and his brother went to Paris, then permanently to America in 1889, despite the warnings of their father. for more click here

Solve a Leith Mystery?

Friday, June 27th, 2008


Birnie Rhind RSA 1906
Private Collection

‘Could this be the face of the Reverend J.S. Mill, minister of Kirkgate U.F. Church until 1903? If you know and can prove it please let me know at arthuc01@hotmail.com.

Thanks in anticipation

Imprentit: 500 Years of the Scottish Printed Word

Friday, June 27th, 2008

EDINBURGH.- From bibles to the Beezer, dictionaries to demonology, Lanark to logarithms and from temperance to television, the printed word in Scotland has had a profound impact on every aspect of our nation’s life over the last five centuries. ‘Imprentit: 500 Years of the Scottish Printed Word’ is a major new exhibition at the National Library of Scotland, which takes a fascinating look at this rich history, giving visitors a rare chance to view some of the highlights from the Library’s vast collection of treasures. for more click here

The Kirkgate Church 1893/94

Thursday, June 26th, 2008


Town Plan of Edinburgh (north east part) Surveyed: 1893-4

United Presbyterian Church of Scotland

Thursday, June 26th, 2008

The United Presbyterian Church of Scotland (1847-1900) was a Scottish Presbyterian denomination. It was formed in 1847 by the union of the United Secession Church and the Relief Church, and in 1900 merged with the Free Church of Scotland to form the United Free Church of Scotland, which in turn united with the Church of Scotland in 1929. For most of its existence the United Presbyterian Church was the third largest Presbyterian Church in Scotland, and stood on the liberal wing of Scots Presbyterianism. The Church’s name was often abbreviated to the initials U.P.for more click here

Proposed Canal through Leith Links

Thursday, June 26th, 2008

Thankfully this proposal wasn’t accepted!!

Name: Kirkwood, Robert, fl. 1806-1828
Title: This plan of the City of Edinburgh and its environs.
Imprint: Edinburgh : Kirkwood & Son, 1817.
source-nls

United Secession Church

Thursday, June 26th, 2008

The United Secession Church (or properly the United Associate Synod of the Secession Church) was a Scottish Presbyterian denomination. It was founded in 1820 by a union of various churches which had seceded from the established Church of Scotland and existed until 1847. for more click here

Anti-Burgher

Thursday, June 26th, 2008

The Anti-Burghers were opponents of the Burgher Oath on theological grounds.

In 1733 the first secession from the Church of Scotland resulted in the creation of the “Associate Presbytery”. This church split in 1747 over the issue of the Burgher Oath, which required holders of public offices to affirm approval of the religion “presently professed in this kingdom”. The issue was civil compulsion in religious affairs (which, it can be argued, can be seen partly in the context of a post-Battle of Culloden (1746) panic by the Hanoverian government), but was effectively a forerunner of the arguments over the separation of church and state. Opponents of the Burgher Oath on theological grounds became known as the Anti-Burghers — showing a distinctive independence of conviction and an unwillingness to compromise over sincerely held beliefs. The Burgher and Anti-Burgher factions thus formed rival, independent synods. for more click here

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