History of Leith, Edinburgh

Archive for 2006

Wooden Water Pipes

Wednesday, December 20th, 2006

pipes.jpg

Wooden Pipes were used in Leith in the past to transport water from Lochend to the top of the Kirkgate. Examples of these pipes can be seen in the Huntly House Museum in Edinburgh. The above picture is of the London wooden water main system.

Celtic Shield

Wednesday, December 20th, 2006

Celtic.jpg

Although found in the Thames this is the sort of votive offering which would have been made to the Celtic Gods in Edinburgh at the time. In the 18th century when Duddingston Loch was being deepened bronze Swords and spears were found.

Bruce at Bannockburn

Wednesday, December 20th, 2006

Bruce.jpg

Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn 1314. Stirling Castle can be seen in the background. Robert received treatment from the Knights of St John at Leith in 1327 for a condition that is still uncertain.

The Union of the Scottish and English Parliaments 1707

Wednesday, December 20th, 2006

Parliament.jpg

Queen Anne is seen with the treaty of Union of the Parliaments of England and Scotland along with the Commissioners

Charles II

Wednesday, December 20th, 2006

charles-3.jpg

Charles II being welcomed by General Monk who had controlled Leith under Cromwell. Charles II was the last King of Scotland to be crowned at Scone in 1651

The Execution of Charles I 1649

Wednesday, December 20th, 2006

Charles-2.jpg

Charles didn’t only play golf on Leith links but his Coat of arms can be seen over the West door of South Leith Parish Church.

View of Edinburgh in the 1940’s

Wednesday, December 20th, 2006

edinburgh-1.jpg

The Mercat Cross, Edinburgh

Wednesday, December 20th, 2006

Mercat.jpg

View of Edinburgh Castle

Wednesday, December 20th, 2006

Edinburgh-Castle.jpg

A right royal scandal

Wednesday, December 20th, 2006

THE modern age, which tends to take a rather superior view of the past, thinks of itself as better informed about its rulers than were its benighted predecessors. Why wouldn’t it be? Technology—in the form of hot-metal presses, radio, television and the internet—has allowed information to spread at the speed first of trains, then of sound-waves and now of light. for more click here

Some Text